American Veteran 03

       


Billy La-Gois Insley

November 26, 1933 ~ June 21, 2019 (age 85)

Friday, June 21, 2019, Captain Billy La-Gois Insley, 85, of Cambridge pulled anchor for the last time. He drifted to the other side to never return.

He lived a good life until 2012 when the love of his life Jo Anne Robinson Insley passed. They were married February 5, 1955.

Born in Andrews, Maryland, Billy was a son of the late Walter Insley and Naomi McFeeters Burton.

He had worked in the saw mills for A. K. Spicer for many years before joining the Maryland Marine Police in 1962. From Cobb Island and later transferred to Kent Island, Billy became captain of the patrol boat “Eastern Bay”. He later became captain of the Maryland State Yacht the “Fifty Fifty”. The State later sold the “Fifty Fifty” and purchased the 112 ft. “Maryland Independence”. Billy obtained his license to operate 100 ton class vessels. Both of the yachts were docked in Annapolis. He retired after thirty years of service.

After retiring, Billy went to work for C.J. Langefelder at Love Point, Stevensville, Maryland.

Billy was Past Master of Centreville MD Lodge #180 with lifetime membership in the D. John Coates Memorial Lodge # 1787.

He will be ever missed by daughter Teri Robin Insley and significant other Jeffrey Craig Phillips of Cambridge, MD; granddaughter Brandi Nicole Fletcher and husband Greg of Huffman, Texas; great-grandsons Kiernan C. and Kielovan J. Fletcher also of Texas; brother Dal Insley of Andrews, MD; sister in-law Goldona Insley of Cambridge along with many nieces, nephews and friends.

Preceding him in death besides his parents and wife were brothers Hubert Burton, Boyce Insley and O’Neil Insley.

Billy requested that there be no services. His body was donated to the State Anatomy Board for medical education and research.

Those he knew he loved and those who knew him were blessed. 

 

Poet Robert Test beautifully states:

 

To Remember Me

 

At a certain moment a doctor will determine that my brain has ceased to function and that, for all intents and purposes, my life has stopped.

When that happens, do not attempt to instill artificial life into my body by the use of a machine. And don't call this my "deathbed." Call it my "bed of life," and let my body be taken from it to help others lead fuller lives.

Give my sight to a man who has never seen a sunrise, a baby's face or love in the eyes of a woman.

Give my heart to a person whose own heart has caused nothing but endless days of pain.

Give my blood to the teenager who has been pulled from the wreckage of his car, so that he might live to see his grandchildren play.

Give my kidneys to one who depends on a machine to exist from week to week.

Take my bones, every muscle, every fiber and nerve in my body and find a way to make a crippled child walk.

Explore every corner of my brain. Take my cells, if necessary, and let them grow so that someday a speechless boy will shout at the crack of a bat and a deaf girl will hear the sound of rain against her windows.

Burn what is left of me and scatter the ashes to the winds to help the flowers grow.

If you must bury something, let it be my faults, my weaknesses and all my prejudice against my fellow man.

Give my sins to the devil. Give my soul to God. If, by chance, you wish to remember me, do it with a kind deed or word to someone who needs you. If you do all I have asked, I will live forever.

 

 

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